innerlight


Leave a comment

Farther On

This song, by the Alaska String Band has been replaying over and over in my mind for the last week since my roommate first played it for me.

All religious language of God and Jesus aside here (I am not a religious person in any sense of the word), it’s as if my inner one wanted me to hear this when I tried to take my life two and a half years ago. She wants me to hear this now, to comfort me, and reassure me, and help me heal from that time. I’m not sure where she ends and my higher power begins. She and my highest self are the same. This was her voice, steady and unwavering, and which I couldn’t hear. It’s as if she is singing it to me now, telling me how much she loves me. She takes my hand, and tells me she is there, has always been there, and will never leave me. She will never stop singing this song to me. This is her voice now and always.

“Farther on, still go farther … Jesus will foresake you never. It is better farther on.”


1 Comment

universally human

linked image of book by Thomas Moore

linked image of book by Thomas Moore

i’ve been devouring this book, sent to me by a dear friend who knows how to listen to her intuition.

these quotes taken from the book Original Self: Living with Paradox and Originality by Thomas Moore struck me in the place that CoDA does, and in the place that all deep witnessing does. radical honesty, acceptance. Radical Love:

Discovering with unlimited empathy the ways people are human, we become the person we would hope to be.

(…) Both Shakespeare and archetypal psychology take their power from their capacity to reveal what we all know, if we were only to think openly enough, about the fundamentals of human life. If we could live from that deep place of recognition, we might allow ourselves the beauty of our eccentricity and tolerate in others their efforts to find their souls in the odd collection of emotions, fantasies, and behaviors that form the raw material of a human life.

We go on living when meaning fails and when we don’t get it right. We go on in the presence of mortification, a word that means simply “death-making,” and we become who we are destined to be as much through the death-making as the life-making. Success and happiness are impossible without the continuous nudge of death. Living through our mortifications is the coupon for vitality and the ticket home.

Fame and achievement may not be our destiny. It may be sufficient to be here, to open our hearts, take in what is offered, make our contribution at whatever level is granted, and gracefully depart. In any case, I am not the one who should be worried about the planning, for each life seems to have come equipped with its own tempo and timetable.

Modern psychology tries to tell us that we are constantly developing creatures, but I prefer to think of us as seasonal beings. We have our summers of sunny pleasure and our winters of discontent, our springtimes of renewal and our autumns of necessary decay. We are essentially rhythmic, musical. As the ancients used to say, our emotions are in orbit, like the planets. Patterns that define us return again and again, and in these returns we find our substance and our continuity, our original nature and our identity.